Just Talk! Educational Equity Podcast

Episode 2 Notes - Black History Month: Tool of White Supremacy or Centering Black Experience?

February 14, 2019

Tony and Deborah discuss the problems inherent to creating a meaningful Black History Month experience and how to elevate our practice as educators. Recording, music, logo, and editing by Alvin Zamudio. Produced by Deborah Bohlmann.

HOOK: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wzjv82m1mb0

Aleah Bradshaw of Youth Speaks performs in honor of Black History Month at a Golden State Warriors game in 2017.

https://youthspeaks.org/

Founded in 1996 in San Francisco, Youth Speaks has long championed a local, national, and increasingly global movement of young people picking up pens and stepping proudly onto stages, declaring themselves present.

RESOURCES:

King in the Wilderness - HBO documentary 2018 - Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVGRg89DbyM

ORIGINS OF BLACK HISTORY MONTH:

https://asalh.org/about-us/origins-of-black-history-month/

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASLAH) was founded in 1915 by noted African American historian Carter G. Woodson and several colleagues. As a means of promoting greater knowledge of the achievements of African Americans, in February of 1925 Woodson established a week dedicated to that goal, with the hope that in time African American history would be embedded yearlong in school curriculum across the country.  

"What Carter G. Woodson would say about the continued celebrations is unknown, but he would smile on all honest efforts to make black history a field of serious study and provide the public with thoughtful celebrations." - Author Daryl Michael Scott

STANDARDS FOR QUALITY BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATIONS:

  • Leadership identity is key. People of color must have voice and ownership is any programming that pertains to them.
  • Student voice and leadership assures relevance and buy-in.
  • Infusion and connection across curriculum demonstrate the universal value of African American history study.
  • Recognize black history as a movement, not a moment. Seek out opportunities for partnerships, programming, and activities that extend throughout the year, every year.
  • Prioritize ethnic studies and respond to student interests in developing ethnic studies and events beyond February.

 

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